305-6262 (Spanish)

305-9607 (others, sign language)

 

In AIM West, full time Spanish interpreters are stationed in the back of VC205; simply page them overhead or call 305-6262.

 

If there are no interpreters available, you may use the “Pacific Translators Phone Line.” This phone call will automatically connect you to a language bank that can be used for interpretations. Instructions for use, as well as the phone number and access code are attached to the phones in each exam room.  Once connected, provide your name, department (AIM Clinic), and the language needed. This service is also useful for brief conversations, and when calling pts at home.

 

For other languages, including sign language, you should call the “Volunteer Interpreter Corps” at x5-9607. The VIC is located on PH2 (right around the corner from AIM West) and is open Monday through Friday from 9am to 5pm and Saturday from 10am to 2pm.

 

A few tips:

·         Time management is crucial! Call the interpreters early. If they are not available go ahead and use your speaker phone translator.

·         First, quickly review for the medical interpreter the goals of the encounter.

·         If there is something you do not want the patient to hear, don't say it. The interpreters do not edit.

·         When reviewing complex medical information, speak slowly, and allow the interpreter time to process the proper translation.

·         Do not ask interpreters for opinions, comments, or suggestions about the patient's history.

·         Face and speak directly to the patient, not the interpreter. Make eye contact and speak in first person to the patient.

·         If information does not seem clear, ask the interpreter to clarify by repeating your statement back to you in English.

·         When you leave the room, so does the interpreter. Aim to keep their service time to you at no more than 25 minutes, this will help to free them up for other providers.

·         Document that you used an interpreter. That way, you'll also know to call one in advance the next time you see the patient.

·         Relatives and friends of the patient do not make the best interpreters. Even if a family member speaks English, calling in a trained medical interpreter is best. If you do have to use an ad hoc interpreter (employee, family, friend) be sure to first assess his/her English proficiency (ask if he/she is comfortable with the task, engage him/her in basic conversation). As him/her to interpret exactly what the patient says, and not to edit or summarize the information. Never use a minor (under 18) to interpret personal information unless in an emergency situation.  Always be aware of potential issues of confidentiality or conflict of interest between the patient and the interpreter.

ACCESS OUR EXPERIENCED POOL OF LIAISON-INTERPRETER’S BY DIALING Ext. 5-6262.  IF YOU ARE AT AIM WEST THEIR STATION IS LOCATED IN THE BACK OF SUITE VC 205.

IF YOU ARE AT AIM EAST, THERE IS ONE INTERPRETER ON SITE FROM THE POOL OF INTERPRETERS, ON A ROTATION BASES.

 

·   THEY ASSIST PATIENTS AND STAFF WITH LANGUAGE NEEDS (INTERPRETING SERVICES AND SIDE TRANSLATION).

 

·   THEY CARRY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORKING ALONGSIDE AIM PHYSICIANS IN INNUMERABLE PATIENT ENCOUNTERS. BEYOND TRANSLATING, THEY HELP NEW AIM PHYSICIANS NAVIGATE PATIENT CARE RESOURCES ON-SITE.

 

·   THEY ACT AS LIAISONS BETWEEN THE MEDICAL STAFF AND OUR PATIENTS, PRACTICING EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND TEACHING OF CULTURAL AWARENESS.